How to Share Your Faith in the Public School

Disclaimer: This post is not meant as legal advice. It is purely my thoughts and opinions. Experts disagree as what exactly your rights as a teacher are. Please seek a legal professional for help.

Update: Check out this post here for a more in-depth analysis of what is & isn’t legally allowed.

When I shared the post “Should Teachers Leave Their Faith at Home?” I got some interesting responses. We all know that the secular world does not want Christians to share their faith, but I was somewhat saddened that so many Christian public school teachers seemed to agree, maintaining that religion has no place in the classroom.

Others, however, wanted to know how exactly they could share their faith in the public school. And, wow, this is a tough question, one I didn’t really feel qualified to answer as I’ve only taught in Christian schools, not public. But as I thought about it and discussed the question with some public school teachers, I realized that the answer is not quite as difficult as I thought.

How Christian teachers can share their faith in the public school

Our Faith Must Impact Every Aspect of our Lives

Before I get to that, though, we as Christians have to realize something very important. It’s what I was trying to say in the “Should Teachers Leave Their Faith at Home” post, but I’m not so sure people really got it. As Christians, we cannot compartmentalize our faith. If we truly believe in Christ and desire to follow Him, then our faith should impact every aspect of our lives, no matter what our vocation is.

As Christians, we cannot compartmentalize our faith. 

We shouldn’t be turning our faith on for Sunday morning and back off for the rest of the week. As teachers, God has given us an important area of influence, and we have the awesome responsibility and privilege to be a light in this dark world.

Yes, there are legal issues. Yes, there are restrictions. No, I’m not telling you to stand up in the middle of your class and proclaim, “Thus saith the Lord!” But the point is that if you’re a Christian then you shouldn’t be able to turn that on and off. Your faith should influence what you say and what you do. It should permeate your life.

And it should mean that you are looking for opportunities to share the truth.

So how exactly do you do that? I’m glad you asked……

How to Share Christ as a Public School Teacher

  1. Show Christ through your actions. If our students are ever going to be open to what we have to say, they need to see Christ in who we are and what we do. So love your students, and be an example of a believer, showing Him through your conduct and daily interactions. Check out our post “10 Ways to Show Christ to Your Students” for some specific idea of how exactly to do this.

  2. Embrace the truth. Every single teacher has preconceived philosophies and ideas that they bring with them to the classroom. The difference is that ours are the truth. So if others are going to spread their false philosophies, we certainly shouldn’t muzzle our true ones.

    God’s truths are not just for Sunday mornings; they are still true the rest of the week.

    Yes, there are restrictions. So once again, I’m not saying to stand in the hallway and start preaching the gospel. But God’s truths – His universal truths that apply to every aspect of our lives – should be such a part of you that they impact everything you do and naturally weave themselves into your teachings and interactions. If they aren’t, then you need to get into the Word and really start to embrace its truths, allowing them to impact every part of you. To help you get started, check out our posts on Thinking Biblically.  

  3. Objectively discuss faith when it applies to the curriculum. According to the Liberty Counsel, you are absolutely free to discuss faith as it applies to your curriculum. For example, if you are discussing ancient Egypt, it is appropriate to discuss their religious beliefs and how they differ from the beliefs people commonly hold today. The goal of such discussions should be to get the students thinking and to prompt them to ask questions. Because if they ask questions, you are then free to answer them. [For more information about your rights as a public school teacher, check out the whole report from the Liberty Counsel, courtesy of CEAI.]

  4. Honestly answer questions about your faith.  You have great freedom to answer questions that students ask of you, whether in the classroom or one-on-one. So when students ask you a question that relates to your faith, answer it as openly and honestly as you can. If you feel it’s necessary, you can preface your response by letting them know that this is your personal belief or opinion.
     
  5. Pray for your students and for opportunities to speak. Spend time praying for your students as well as their parents and your fellow teachers. And ask specifically that God would not only give you opportunities to speak truth into their lives but that He would help you recognize and take advantage of them.

How else do you share your faith in the public school? Share your experience with a comment below.

Resources:

Linda Kardamis

I believe that when God calls us to teach, He promises the strength & wisdom to do it well. All we need to do is keep learning, growing, and depending on Him. I’m here to provide practical advice and Biblical encouragement so you’ll have the confidence and perspective to not only inspire your students but reach their hearts as well.

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below

Brittany - June 16, 2014

Honestly, sharing your faith in a public school doesn’t have to be as difficult as it seems. You don’t have to stand up and give a sermon. Just let His light shine through everything you do, and find opportunities to mention it when you can.

For example: “Did everyone have a nice weekend? Did anyone do anything fun?…Well, we went to church like always and then did some gardening. It was really nice.” Easy peasy.

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Linda Kardamis - June 20, 2014

I received these great thoughts from Ally in an email. Thanks for sharing!

My name is Ally and this past year was my first year teaching. I taught 5th grade in a public school. Here are a few things I did to share Jesus with my students this year.

1) Using Gospel language in every day situations: I would use words like grace, redemption, joy, love, etc. to constantly be weaving the Gospel into our classroom even if the students had no idea that’s what I was doing.

2) Playing worship music/praying in my classroom before and after the students come in: I wanted the Kingdom to be present in my classroom, and I know that starts with me. I wanted my heart to be in a state of constant worship before, during, and after school. I found these songs were stuck in my head all day and were shaping my attitude and patience with my students.

3) Golden Rule: I only had one rule and it was the Golden rule. I loved secretly have Scripture present all over my classroom. It’s a simple rule that encompasses so many different situations in the classroom.

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    Anonymous - September 23, 2014

    Good Points :)!

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    Anonymous - February 11, 2016

    Awesome!

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    Anonymous - November 5, 2016

    These are great suggestions. As a school nurse, I am seeing an epidemic of unmanageable anxiety in students–from grades K-12! It is heartbreaking and I just wish that I could openly share the gospel and pray with these students. For the older kids in the throes of anxiety, I do sometimes ask if they belong to a church and if there is a pastor or someone there that they could share their problems with. The one thing that we all can do, all the time, is pray.

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Anonymous - June 29, 2014

Do not share your faith in school. Focus on teaching your students. I think it is unfair to try and subliminally push religion on students. ask yourself, Would it be okay if I an atheist did the same? what if a satanist teacher followed these tactics? would it be okay? if your answer is know you need to rethink! This is wrong and you should be ashamed. this is america!

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    Laura - July 2, 2014

    I could NOT separate my faith in God from what I do and who I am. I share my life with my students, who are my “family” for the nine months I have them. They know what I believe because of that. Period.

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    A blessed teacher - November 12, 2014

    Why should anyone who shares love be ashamed? You are correct we live in America and we has the freedom to express just as the students I teach have the freedom to express. My students come from all backgrounds and most of the are abused or living in poverty so please tells me what is wrong with sharing hope? I see satan everyday in the news and in the fights in the hallway so peace in my classroom I will take it every day!

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      Rebecca - May 9, 2015

      If you know they are being abused it would be better to seek real help for them, like getting them out of the abusive home…instead of “sharing hope”…hope of what exactly? That God will decide someday the child has had enough abuse and strike down the abuser with a thunderbolt from heaven? When has that ever happened?

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    Michael - April 23, 2016

    Exactly, this is America where a variety of views and opinions are held. Children need to learn how to live with people of other views and how to express there own rather than hold only to their own perspective as you do. This article is a great piece about how someone can incorporate their faith into action and not about surreptitious “indoctrination”.

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    Wendy Brock - January 10, 2017

    It’s not wrong to share God because he stated “I am the way, the truth, and the life”. No other religion states that.
    It is wrong to share other religions that do not speak the truth .

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      Angel - November 28, 2017

      How do u know that his word is truth and that other God’s are not? What makes ur religion better? Jesus himself said… He is no better than anyone else. He has done everything imaginable that we will ever do or try. Do not preach what u do not understand for god can never be understood. Ones beliefs is not better than anothers. No one has the right to tell a child that their religion is truth and only the truth.. you will never and can never know that..

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    Anonymous - October 15, 2017

    Ignorant response as well as grammatically wrong! She did NOT say that she was preaching in class. She was being herself. Her faith is a part of her every day being. Same as it would be for an “atheist” or “Satanist” as you put it. She is not forcing anything on these children. That starts at home. And you are right on one thing! This is America, free to be who we want to be and believe what we want to believe. And free to make OUR OWN CHOICES. Meaning, these students are free to believe whatever it is that they want to believe. Just because a teacher is implementing their faith into the classroom in small ways, does not mean they are making you convert yourself or your beliefs.

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      Angel - November 28, 2017

      It depends on how the teacher is implement in their beliefs within the classroom. If a teacher is playing Christian music all day or reading a Christian based book allowed in class, then yes,, they are wrong. I can say this and stand a firm ground on the issue as well. I believe in God and went to law school as well. I strongly support both of them.

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spirit - June 29, 2014

I’m sure if a Muslim were a teacher and discussing how they ‘weave’ their faith into the classroom to subtly influence their students you would be up in arms. This is why you do need to ‘turn off your faith’ when you step in a classroom. School is not about you and your faith, it’s about teaching kids. You want to ‘weave’ your beliefs into the classroom? Be careful what you wish for, because that means any one of ANY religion gets to do the same.

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    Anonymous - February 29, 2016

    Even if the faithful people do it or not, the other ones like atheists, satanic worshipers, and Muslims do it for sure.. so why not promoting the good as much as you can?

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    Michael - April 23, 2016

    I doubt anyone would have a problem with a Muslim living her faith and being a teacher. It’s healthy for children to be interested in other views and opinions which includes faith and have questions about it. It doesn’t mean that they will become a Muslim just because they have questions. Your response shows how little you understand the article. The author was talking about how to practice your faith while being a tacher not how to be a part of a secret conspiracy.

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    Angel - November 28, 2017

    I agree completely. Work is work

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Allie - June 29, 2014

Maybe instead of indoctrinating children when they are vulnerable by feeding them sugar coated biblical stories and disguising ignorance under the veil of “God’s plan,” you could teach them science, history, math, English, love and compassion, fairness, and honesty without any religious ties and then let THEM decide what they WANT to believe when they are old enough to make an informed decision. Talk about caring for your students.

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    Anonymous - December 8, 2015

    Considering the story of Samson, Sodom and Gomorrah, And the story right before the Crucifixion and how dark they were, Its saccharin coated at best. It’s really just a happier story-line than us taking forever and a day to evolve into the degraded society we are.

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    Michael - April 23, 2016

    Under that line of reasoning, we shouldn’t teach them any secular ideas for much the same reason. After all, you wouldn’t want to unduly influence young minds. Although, as most secular education is biased, you’re basically declaring that you’re against public education.

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Linda Kardamis - June 30, 2014

Just wanted to give a couple thoughts in response to some of these comments. I certainly don’t except unbelievers to understand, but for any Christian teachers out there who are wondering about some of these things, here’s a few thoughts….

1) Lots of people ask if we would want atheists etc. talking about their view in the classroom – The problem is, they are. In fact, the entire public school system (no, not every teacher but the system in general) is designed to indoctrinate students into secular humanism. So, yes, we should be pushing back against this.

2) We have the truth. We are not the same as another religion or an atheist or another worldview. I know everyone thinks they have the truth, but we actually do. And thus we have a responsibility to share it when we can.

3) Yes, this is America. This is America where our Founding Fathers believed that Biblical truths were so integral to our survival as a nation that they built our Constitution on them, that they engraved them on our government buildings, that they fashioned their lives after them, and – yes – that they wanted them to be taught in our schools. And for the first 150 years in this country the schools did just that – taught Christianity outright. It’s only been a relatively recent development that Christianity has been banned – and, really, do we honestly think it’s made the schools better than they used to be?

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    Jess - July 4, 2014

    The founders and those after have consistently stated that this is NOT a Christian nation. Christianity is NOT referred to in the Constitution. Look more closely at the beliefs of the founders and realize that many were deists at best. Do not confuse out of context quotes by a few with the majority opinions of the whole group. It is a nation where everyone has freedom to practice their religion, but this also means freedom FROM religion. As a public school teacher you work for the department of education, an extension of the government and as such should not be promoting any religion.

    Christianity is not banned, it is not to be taught by teachers. It can be discussed in a religions of the world course in conjunction with all other faiths. It can be embraced and lead by students. If students want to form a Christianity based group you can be the adviser, that’s fine.

    You can feel you “have the truth” but which denominations version of the truth? Students who are curious and want to know more about Christianity have no shortage of resources in any area, there are churches in abundance they can go to for spiritual guidance, they don’t need you to do anything but share your academic expertise.

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      Anonymous - September 23, 2014

      In God We Trust is the United States official motto so obviously we are a christian nation :). If its wrong then it shouldn’t be on the thing we use most, MONEY!

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    Anonymous - July 5, 2014

    You proclaiming that you have the only truth only shows your ignorance. You should not be teaching anyone.

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    Math Teacher - July 6, 2014

    And all other faiths believe they have the truth too.You have to admit that all the thousands sects of Christianity believe their version is the “truth”. How can you proclaim you’re not the same? What objective knowledge do you possess of other religions?
    You also lack substantial knowledge of The Constitution and the Founders. These were people of The Enlightenment. Their influences were the writings of Locke and the Ancient Greeks. You might want to read the writings of James Madison, the writer of the Bill of Rights instead of getting your kooky knowledge of history from Wallbuilders. Additionally, The Founders deliberately wrote the Constitution as an amendable document for good and rational reasons. Do you believe women’s right to vote should be rescinded??

    Though it is very difficult to compare the schools of today than the schools of over 100 years ago, I believe the education kids receive today far surpasses how children were taught then. All was rote learning then and not to mention the subjects taught. It’s also true that most children didn’t graduate high school as most people lived on farms. Children generally didn’t go to school beyond 8th grade and sometimes less.

    You have some good ideas in regards to classroom management, but you have revealed yourself to be an “indoctrinator” of a belief system that is your right to have but it is NOT your right to indoctrinate our children in public schools.

    Peace.

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      Anonymous - September 23, 2014

      In God We Trust- research that one and let us know what you find. Good Day 🙂

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    Anonymous - September 23, 2014

    Comment #1 is exactly what’s happening. Well put Linda 🙂

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    Alan L - March 13, 2016

    ” In fact, the entire public school system (no, not every teacher but the system in general) is designed to indoctrinate students into secular humanism. So, yes, we should be pushing back against this.

    2) We have the truth. We are not the same as another religion or an atheist or another worldview. ”

    These are two extremely dubious propositions, and suggest that you see your Christian mission as attacking on the Constitutional prohibition of advancing any particular religious view through public schools or other activities funded by all taxpayers.

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      Linda Kardamis - March 13, 2016

      There is no constitutional prohibition against advancing religious views in school. Indeed the Congress specifically authorized the Bible to be used in public schools and the founders firmly believed it should be an integral part of the curriculum. The first amendment guarantees religious freedom and was intended to keep the government from establishing a state church. It was never intended to keep the bible or Christianity out of schools, the government, or public life. That’s what a court ruling said but it is never what the Constitution said or intended.

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        Angel - November 28, 2017

        I would have your job if your were teaching at my child’s school. In no way are you to implement your gospel sayings into my child’s life. Her preacher and I do that. She prays in her spare time and reads as well, but no one has the right to tell her or influence her beliefs, not even I. Further, no other religions are to be implemented into my child’s life unless strictly educational. She and only she gets to decide who and what religion she will worship.

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    Kelsey - August 3, 2016

    Amen, Linda!

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    Canada - September 16, 2016

    Should God and the bible be discussed in public schools? Really, that is the question. I ask, “Why not?”

    By the way, I live in Canada. When I was growing up as a student in public schools, every morning we sang “God saves the Queen” and our national anthem “Oh, Canada”. Both of these anthems recognize and acknowledge God. And yet today, we do not sing the former and rarely the latter. Why?

    In addition, when opened each week with the “Lord’s Prayer”. Today, Canada does not. Why not?

    Today, I am a public school teacher. I have been teaching for over twenty years. Along with other religions, I routinely talk about God, Christianity and the gospel. Why wouldn’t I? I talk about other religions.

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    Angel - November 28, 2017

    U only know what u read in a book and what u feel.. if that is truth to you then more power to u. I guarantee u have never seen god, never seen Jesus either. U couldn’t have. Truth is factual, something u can prove. U can’t prove god existed or still does. U only have a book. I was raised Baptist from birth. Let me tell u, I do not shun anyone’s belief, but don’t think mine is higher or more truthful than anothers either. I am me and I am a kind honest open minded hopeful and praying person who wishes all children and adults the best. Only time will tell. Only then will we ever know the truth. Keep religion out of work and work on religion during after work hours all day everyday. The law is the law. You wouldn’t question his law, don’t question Americas law.. church and state are separate.

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      Linda Kardamis - November 28, 2017

      I completely disagree that truth is what can be proved. Truth is what is true, whether it can be proven scientifically or not. God either is or He isn’t. Both cannot possibly be true. He is either loving or He isn’t. He is either holy or He isn’t. Not all religions can possibly be true – they are mutually exclusive.

      My faith is based on the Bible, which, while it is a book, is a quite remarkable book. The claims made by the Bible, while they may not be able to be proven scientifically, have a host of empirical evidence that support them. And they have certainly never been disproven. In short, it does take a step of faith to believe the Bible, but it is a reasonable step of faith that is backed by both personal & empirical evidence.

      Of course everyone is free to believe what they choose to. But to say that all beliefs are equally valid or equally true is utter nonsense. That’s what our society tries to tell us, but think it out – it makes no sense. It cannot possibly be true.

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Anonymous - June 30, 2014

Well said! Christians need to stop bowing the knee to Baal, take up their cross and follow Jesus, where in America mandates are constantly prohibiting us to hold onto and practice our God given freedom.

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Lisa - July 4, 2014

Thank you, Linda, for such a well-written blog. I am a fellow Christian educator and I am grateful for any opportunity to share my faith — whether it be in or out of the classroom. You are right. We cannot expect unbelievers to understand (yet), but ONE DAY EVERY KNEE WILL BOW AND EVERY TONGUE WILL CONFESS THAT JESUS CHRIST IS LORD.

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Anonymous - July 5, 2014

I am a teacher in a public school classroom. A couple of comments or reactions I give my students are: I only tolerate loving Christ-like behavior and try to be an example. I will mention it was good to see a student in church or ask what church they attend if any after I comment how I like a Christian related shirt or jewelry. I thank a student for “praying” when they say “God” out loud. When the kids ask I tell them my favorite books are Christian romance or my favorite music is Christian. In my classroom I let all know that we respect all cultures and religions and share without judgment for even though I know Christianity I is true and Christ is The Way, The Truth, and The Life….a true Christian tries to love all. Just some thoughts. Thank you for sharing u our thoughts.

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    Alan L - March 13, 2016

    I’m sure the Jewish, Muslim, Buddhist, and secular students in your classes appreciate the special attention you give to Christian students.

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Linda Kardamis - July 7, 2014

Great thoughts! Love the emphasis on loving others, being real, and just letting your students see how much your faith is a part of who you are.

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Laura Langhoff - July 14, 2014

I am a Christian and have taught in public schools my whole professional life and #3 is very questionable. The bottom line is that whether or not we Christians like it, people are allowed to not believe in Jesus. They did during Bible times and they can now.

Christians can live their faith without using words and in the public school they should. Being sneaky Christians shows no integrity and there is no Biblical example of going to someone’s children to sneakily preach the Gospel because they happen to be in your classroom.

You may wear a cross necklace and you may answer direct questions. If students ask you what you did over the weekend you can tell them you went to church or about a church picnic in the same way they can tell you what they did. You don’t have to hide it (neither do your students) but you may not be overt about it. Students should NEVER feel they need to agree with your beliefs in order to be successful in your class.

Seriously, Christian or not, who tells people to be subversive with children? That’s just not okay.

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Scott - February 18, 2015

Thank you Linda for standing up for the faith. Don’t let unbelievers get you down, live the faith and reach out in love to everyone as I see you already do. God bless in Jesus’ name.

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Anonymous - May 30, 2015

Linda,
You have struck a cord in your readers and for that, kudos. Continue to follow God’s calling in supporting educators. As a Christian science teacher, I too have struggled to find balance in what I am allowed to teach/do inside and outside the classroom. I have settled on this; that I can love each student who walks into my classroom, knowing they come from different backgrounds, struggles and religions. God has called me to Love. Period. That is what makes us, Christians, different. Our hope comes from the Lord. He shows us His handy work all around us, so when facts are presented for tests that disagree with the Biblical account of creation, I make it a point to state that not all scientists agree on this, but you need to know it for your test. (Ex. age of the earth is 4.6 billion years opposed to approximately 6000 years old). Daily, science is discovering new things, putting into question evolutionary bias that permeates public school science classrooms today.
As you said in an earlier post, evolutionists are indoctrinating our youth and rather than teaching discovery, inquiry and seeking of truth, the rose colored glasses of atheism has hamstrung the thinking of future generations. I do pray for my kiddos, accept them and let them know they matter to me. Kindness and firm when need be. They do not know by my words of my personal faith in Jesus Christ, but I pray they see Jesus through me.

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Laura Langhoff - July 25, 2015

I am a Christian and have taught in public schools my whole professional life and #3 is very questionable. The bottom line is that whether or not we Christians like it, people are allowed to not believe in Jesus. They did during Bible times and they can now.

Christians can live their faith without using words and in the public school they should. Being sneaky Christians shows no integrity and there is no Biblical example of going to someone’s children to sneakily preach the Gospel because they happen to be in your classroom.

You may wear a cross necklace and you may answer direct questions. If students ask you what you did over the weekend you can tell them you went to church or about a church picnic in the same way they can tell you what they did. You don’t have to hide it (neither do your students) but you may not be overt about it. Students should NEVER feel they need to agree with your beliefs in order to be successful in your class.

Seriously, Christian or not, who tells people to be subversive with children? That’s just not okay.

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Laura Langhoff - August 31, 2015

I am a Christian and have taught in public schools my whole professional life and #3 is very questionable. The bottom line is that whether or not we Christians like it, people are allowed to not believe in Jesus. They did during Bible times and they can now.

Christians can live their faith without using words and in the public school they should. Being sneaky Christians shows no integrity and there is no Biblical example of going to someone’s children to sneakily preach the Gospel because they happen to be in your classroom.

You may wear a cross necklace and you may answer direct questions. If students ask you what you did over the weekend you can tell them you went to church or about a church picnic in the same way they can tell you what they did. You don’t have to hide it (neither do your students) but you may not be overt about it. Students should NEVER feel they need to agree with your beliefs in order to be successful in your class.

Seriously, Christian or not, who tells people to be subversive with children? That’s just not okay.

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Wonderful Teacher for Him - October 16, 2015

I am so thankful to God that I found this website. I am from another country and I knew Jesus back in my country. I am so sad that America now turn to be ashamed of the Gospel and pushing themselves far away from God whom so love the world. On top of that, America is no longer the place that freedom of speech and faith can be practice anymore. I pray for America though because God loves everyone. At one public school that I worked last year, there was many Christian teachers and some of them did the same thing on occasion like singing carolling song during Christmas time with her guitar and it brought wonderful atmostphere into that classroom. I hope when people really open their hearts to Jesus Christ then they will realize that Jesus is not limited by the word “religion” but it is a personal relationship with Him!!! It is very personal and a person will never know him until his heart really wants to open up and know him.
Thank you for creating this website.
May God continue to shine His Love and His Light through your life

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Christine - February 19, 2016

I have taught in an after school program for four years. I have also worked in and out of classrooms for the past four years as well. I just obtained my teaching degree and I am moving on to my own classroom. I am a Christian seeking to know there are others like myself out there and how they approach sharing Jesus in thier classrooms. After reading all of these posts I can say that I am reminded of the scripture in James.

Not many of you should become teachers, my fellow believers, because you know that we who teach will be judged more strictly.

I have always believed that teaching is a calling not a job. I believe that the influence that a teacher has over a child is a gift from God. Because that same influence can create something wonderful in that child or can tear them apart. That is why I believe we as teachers will be judged more strictly. Because we hold influence over the lives of others. When I think of having influence over the life of a child for years to come, I want them to look back and see Jesus. I want them to always feel loved and safe knowing that there was something special about me and that special thing was the light of Jesus. After all we as Christians are called to go out into all the world spreading his word.

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    Anonymous - February 22, 2016

    Christine: Very well said! I feel like the most important thing I can do for my students is love them and show God’s love through me! You said it better than I can!
    I have taught for many years, and I know that my students don’t necessarily remember all the curriculum that I have tried to teach, but they do remember how I treated them and the joy of the Lord in me!

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Debora Rinehart - April 12, 2016

I teach in a Catholic school. Recently when talking about what the church believes, what the students believe and what the bible tells us I was happy to see that my students had done their reading – “Does that mean we can sell our daughters?” No, that is part of the Old Testament and was replaced with the New Testament. But the part about not “spilling the seed” – lying with a man was in the Old Testament. Shouldn’t we have to find evidence in the New Testament?

Then finally, “The bible does not say that Jesus was not married, that any of the disciples were not partners with other men, or that Jesus would not love them and accept them as he loves and accepts himself. So, what are we really trying to say? We want to interpret the bible, church doctrine and what we hear in mass as a way to make others less than ourselves? Are we saying we are biblical scholars and have the moral responsibility to call out behavior that we deem not biblically sound when we have not even studied Jesus’ history – when we don’t really know if he was gay himself, or married with children – and if so, where are Jesus’ ancestral children today? Those are the bigger questions?

This was done by sixth grade students for a critical thinking and analysis assignment – using the facts as though the students were scientists.

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    Linda Kardamis - April 12, 2016

    Romans 1:24-27 is pretty clear as well as the rest of Scripture which always represents a man and a woman as a true marriage and homosexuality as wrong. If an answer is not clear in Scripture then we should be careful, but when the Bible clearly speaks we must stand where it stands.

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Clint - June 17, 2016

The first week of school I always ask the students what their favorite book of all time is. I get all sorts of responses. Everything from Harry Potter to the Hunger Games. Then I ask them if they want to know my favorite book. Of course they say yes. I hold up my Bible and tell them that it is my favorite book. You’d be amazed at how this opens doors for me to talk to Christian students off to the side! I love building relationships with all my students, but it is extra special when a fellow believer is discovered!

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prakash giri - July 23, 2016

I would like to express my gratitude .I am so pleased to know it.Im from Nepal but here is very strict.so i would be grateful if i could get the ideas how i can do with Hindu and Budddhist students background.

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Abe Mencher - August 23, 2016

Holy sugarsnacks, these Christian zealots are scary. This sounds like a collection of people planning the practice of the most backhanded subversive indoctrination I have ever heard of. In no way should you be permitted to teach about your religion in schools in any aspect or manner, EVER. Your religion is a personal choice and has nothing to do with education! Schools have IRP’s for a reason, what is held within them is the only information you should be doling out to students. I could have the opinion that killing anybody who is not white or is a Jew is the RIGHT thing to do because I have a book by a very famous man that tells me how righteous I would be to do so. Does this mean that I should whip it out and tell all the students that Mein Kampf it is MY FAVORITE BOOK as suggested by Clint? “Every year it opens up a doorway to talking to all the local skinhead kids off to the side about all the wonderful things we can learn about this year”. By sneakily suggesting such things though almost subliminal conversation is proportionate to being a psychopath like Manson. This is also all coming from a practicing Jew.

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Anonymous - November 15, 2016

I am a Christian math teacher in a Texas school. Before I became a math teacher, I was a Baptist pastor. I am very careful not to “share my faith” as it were. I believe those two spheres should be completely separate. However, because I am concerned for my students, I want them to know God as I do. I have spent much prayer concerning methods for allowing the students to explore issues of faith without compelling them to agree with me. In one class, I have a extra credit assignment in which students are asked to read books by Dawkins, Lennox, Suri, and Krauss (all expert scholars). They are to explore the issues as presented by these authors. Such moments encourage critical thinking, philosophical inquiry, conversations about the role of faith in society, and allow students who are believers (of whatever stripe) to explain why they have come to those conclusions. I am convinced that a Christian teacher can guide discussion and encourage inquiry without using the position of authority to compel students to become Christian.

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David Schmus - January 16, 2017

Christian Educators Association International (ceai.org) is a great resource for Christian educators in public schools. The law does not require educators who are Christians (or Muslims, etc.) to deny their faith to be a teacher. They can answer honestly if asked by their students about their faith. But legally they cannot use their positions as “agents of the state” to favor one religion over another, or favor non-religion over religion. But they can lead their students to ask big questions and discuss worldview issues honestly. Christian educators can also teach bible studies/Good News Clubs/etc. on their campuses after school if they are associated with another outside organization (church, para-church ministry) who requests the room under district guidelines. The Constitution does not require schools to be religion-free zones, and attempts to make them such are just as illegal as a teacher converting students to their faith.

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    Linda Kardamis - January 16, 2017

    Yes! Thank you for sharing this insight. I’m so excited to share an interview with Finn Laursen, director of CEAI, where we dive into this in much more detail. Watch for it in the next two weeks!

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Brandon w ross - May 2, 2017

I agree that like a wise person said: “We must preach the Gospel at all times, and when necessary, use words. The Gospel is a message to be proclaimed with words. God is pleased through the foolishness of preaching, to save some. I know we must love the students and let the love light of Christ shine through us. We can pray as much as we want for the students in private, no law can stop that. Also, we must be ready to give an answer to anyone who asks us for the reason of the hope we have in Christ. Also, I have seen my students at WalMart. There are no rules on what you can or can’t share with them then. They will not care how much they know until they know how much we car. It sounds cliche ish, but it is so true.

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kerry - August 4, 2017

They will know you by your fruits. If you are living a life that is pleasing to God. Students will know you are different and seek out why. Our job as teachers is to teach our job as Christians is to love. Be real, authentic and present in the interactions with your students, and if you are living truly the life that is sold out for God, you won’t need to worry about sharing your faith. You will be living your faith. Jesus was a teacher, follow his example.

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Raf - August 12, 2017

Hey guys. There is a pretty cool kids book called “How to be a good kid.” (Search amazon.com with quotes)…. The purpose of the book is to challenge current social ideologies using quotes (advice) from secular historical figures. If you are serious about challenging current ideologies that open the door for you to talk about our faith, then try this book. Yes. i wrote it for this purpose. I get frustrated with teachers who find excuses NOT to share truths… so I hope this tool will help.

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Anonymous - September 18, 2017

The arrogance of someone who says “our beliefs are the truth” – about your version of the historical sun god (including “walking on water”= sun reflecting on water, “turning water to wine” = the sun fermentation, “fighting darkness” = literally the sun, claiming “I am the light of the world” = derp….). The LEVEL of arrogance and delusion you have to have to say this is “the truth” and then turn around and say you should bring this to PUBLIC SCHOOL, in a nation that has STRICT SEPARATION OF CHURCH AND STATE… is

A. Unconstitutional
B. Arrogant
C. Ridiculous

leave your “faith” where it belongs – anywhere YOU WANT IT TO BE.. as long as it is NOT BEING PAID FOR BY PUBLIC DOLLARS (which is what pays your salary if you are a public school teacher).

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    Linda Kardamis - September 18, 2017

    Hello,
    You may find this article helpful in understanding what separation of church & state mean and what is and is not legally allowed in public schools: https://teach4theheart.com/how-to-legally-share-your-faith-in-public-schools/

    As for your accusation of arrogance, I’m sorry you misunderstand. We believe the Bible to be true – all statements we make about truth are based on what the Bible (God’s Word) says, not what we made up ourselves. If we were to not believe it to be true, we would be very foolish indeed for wasting our time with any of it.

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Mitzi Brooks - December 13, 2017

I am a Christian public school teacher and I am struggling! I am teaching Middle school Science for the first time (26th year of teaching ). Earth history and evolution are coming up in our curriculum. PROBLEM #1: I want to teach creationism along with evolution to show both sides of the issue. I have been told that I am NOT allowed to do this. I can’t even mention creationism.
PROBLEM #2: We’re doing some fun science activities before our break. Today we were dissolving candy canes in different liquids.To start the lesson we talked about the legend of the candy cane and I read the book to the class. *I got the book from the school library! We watched a video of how they are made, answered questions and did the experiment. My principal said I wasn’t allowed to read the book. I told him it came from our school library. It doesn’t matter! As a Christian teacher I am becoming frustrated! If I was of any other faith I could do or say whatever I felt and no one would say a word. Please pray that God will show me what I need to do and give me the strength to do it!

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    Linda Kardamis - December 13, 2017

    Hello,
    I’d recommend checking out this article here for help on what’s legal & what’s not: https://teach4theheart.com/how-to-legally-share-your-faith-in-public-schools/

    I’d also HIGHLY recommend our free Teach with Faith, not Fear training here: https://academy.teach4theheart.com/p/teach-with-faith-not-fear

    Praying for you right now. I’m not a lawyer, but from my understanding, you ARE allowed to bring up religion, the Bible, etc. if it for a legitimate learning purpose and done in an impartial way (i.e. you are not saying that one religion is right but explaining that this is what certain people believe.) However, there is also the Biblical command to be subject to authority… I believe the two resources I mentioned above will help you better understand what is & isn’t allowed – and help you navigate how to handle them in a Christ-honoring manner.

    As for evolution, two thoughts.
    1) Instead of Creationism, look into Intelligent Design (ID). ID approaches the question from a scientific standpoint as opposed to a religious one, and is a theory held by many renowned and legitimate scientists. Your admin may still not be a fan of this, but you have a much stronger leg to stand on with ID than Creationism.
    2) If all else fails, you can’t really go wrong teaching the CONTROVERSY of evolution. In other words, teach evolution. But also teach the reasons why some scientists don’t agree with evolution. This article may be helpful to you in seeing how you could do that: https://ceai.org/2017/11/science-origin-stories/

    Praying for you. Keep fighting the good fight 🙂

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