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Gender Identity, Anxiety, and Depression: Reshaping Identity Issues with the Gospel

At the core of many of the issues facing both teens and adults is a question of identity. From confusion about gender or sexual identity to struggles with anxiety, depression, and self-worth, how we view ourselves is at the core. In this special episode, Jonathan Holmes joins us to explore the differences between a traditional view of identity and a modern one, and how a Gospel identity transcends and transforms both views, enabling us to overcome with our identity fixed in Christ.

Listen here:

What is identity? Identity is a sense of who we are, how we got here, and what we are made for. Everything that we do comes out of that identity. When we understand what someone's identity is and how they've formed it, it helps us to better understand those around us , including our students.

There are three different ways to view our identity: the traditional view, the modern view, and a Gospel-shaped view. This chart outlines the differences between them:

As you can see, what your identity is rooted in can make a big difference in the way you live and view the world. And while we might notice a lot of tension between a traditional and modern view of identity, as believers we must transcend both of these common viewpoints and instead root our identity in the truths of the Gospel.

As Christians, we know what's most important about us: who God says we are. How are you living to show that's your identity?

In the conversation, Jonathan Holmes of Fieldstone Counseling explains these different identities, what they mean for us, and takeaways for Christian teachers. Be sure to listen to the full episode above!

Resources mentioned in this episode

About Jonathan holmes

Jonathan Holmes is the Founder and Executive Director of Fieldstone Counseling. He also serves as the Pastor of Counseling for Parkside Church Bainbridge and Green. Jonathan graduated from The Master’s University with degrees in Biblical Counseling and History and his MA from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He is the author of The Company We Keep and Counsel for Couples and the books, Rescue Skills & Rescue Plan. 

Jonathan has written for a number of sites and organizations including Christianity Today, The Gospel Coalition, Biblical Counseling Coalition, the ERLC, and the Journal for Biblical Counseling. Jonathan serves on the Board of Directors for CCEF (Christian Counseling Educational Foundation) and the Council Board for the BCC (Biblical Counseling Coalition). He is a frequent speaker at conferences and retreats. He and his wife, Jennifer, have four daughters, Ava, Riley, Ruby, and Emma.

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At the core of many of the issues facing both teens and adults is a question of identity. From confusion about gender or sexual identity to struggles with anxiety, depression, and self-worth, how we view ourselves is at the core. As Christian teachers, it's important to know the differences between a traditional view of identity and a modern one, and how a Gospel identity transcends and transforms both views, enabling us to overcome with our identity fixed in Christ.

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  • This is brilliant! Thank you so much for sharing the chart. It seemed to put everything I was “feeling” and “thinking,” yet could not organize it in my brain.

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